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languages as well. >> and we have some more than 70 writers from different countries , from latin america and spain that will be with us as well as the featured country this year, the country of pair guy. and we invite you to the opening of the pavilion next thursday, and we will have the first lady of the country doing the honors of opening the pavilion. so please come by, learn about their culture, traditions and their literature throughout the whole weekend. >> and if you'll welcome -- if you'll excuse on a personal note, i've been working with alina very closely. alina's the executive director of the center here at the college. before that she was the executive director of the miami book fair for i won't tell you how many years. [laughter] it was a lot of years. >> a lot. >> and it's just been announced that alina is now the director of -- executive director of cultural affairs for the entire miami-dade college. we want to congratulate her on her new appointment as well. [applause] >> thank you, thank you. i'm looking forward to that. and part of my new responsibilities is to also wor
transformed america. we historians love to ask one another how it came to be decided to write about a book giving the topic so would you write about 1965? >> guest: i taught the century american history for a number of years mostly brown university, so i really didn't teach the 60's because it wasn't history but later on that became an important part of my courses and then i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60's and like a lot of other historians i became uncomfortable in the notion that the sixties could be described as something 1960 to 1976 so they like to talk to the 30's or the 20s or the 90's and so forth you can do that because of the power throughout the decade. mostly it doesn't work and here is the 60's i don't think it does either. because if you look back at what was happening in the early 60's, 60, 61, 63, 64, at least until kennedy assassination in november, 1963 and so much of daily life and popular culture and music and politics and so forth and the way people dress and so forth seem very much like the 50's and when we think of the fifties we think of
, jaime to 65 transformed america. in the book, the bankrupt prizewinner explores the abyss of the passage of the voting rights act come the summer race riots in troop deployment to vietnam. he discusses the divisive year with howard university modern history professor, daryl scott. >> host: hello, jim. it is my pleasure to be here to discuss her new book, the eve of destruction, how 1965 transformed america. as you know, we historians love to ask one another how it became the issue decided to write about a given topic. what brought you to read about 1965? >> well, i cut 20th century 19th century history for a number of years, mostly at brown university. as we move through this thing, i started doing this in the 60s, so i didn't teach the 60s because it was in history. later on an important part of my courses and i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60s. like a lot of other historians, i became a little bit uncomfortable with the notion that the 60s can be described as something 1960 to 1970. historians like to do this. they like to talk about the 30s or or the 20s or
of the world is doing that. america ranks 29th down the speed of its internet behind such leading industrial world as moldavia and ukraine. we pay the highest prices in the world a fire. by one measure would pay 38 times the japanese pay for bit of information. if you buy triple play package, i have one in my home, you pay an average of texas in the u.s. $160. in france you pay $38 u.s. annika worldwide calling to 70 countries come not just the u.s. and canada. worldwide television, not just domestic. 10 times faster downloading and your painless and 25 cents on the dollar. all this other countries under and the fundamental principle in the chronology rather the key to economic growth of industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. the 20 century came along. it was interstate highway programs and airports that are crucial to economic growth. now it's the information superhighway. the rest of the world is getting the information is deeper highway. as literally told by the chief pr person at ricin that was the phrase i'm not really used anymore. assume the company
have had this decade but it is a close-up on the world of america's society how do we get to 21965 to better understand how much change in place? >> guest: how many books there are on individual years in the '60s bride mentioned the is in my preface. somebody said 1968. that was huge. tet offensive, johnson resigning, and the assassination of martin mr. king, bobby kennedy the wild convention in chicago, woodstock and that sort of thing. it is by no means unique that makes pretty much the same argument that i do i don't have a huge coral with that. in terms of world shattering memorable events then it began to vanish from a view in a hurry. there are real reasons you asked me that but it is why. >> i agree the central year and we could talk about the '60s two talked-about transforming america to say america is not the same after 1965? there is something at stake that 65 bid is meaningful and there is a way one could argue it is not but to have the watershed year is that correct? >> pretty much. not to take it too far but to something starts on january 1st then it is all done to see
places. america is now 29th in the speed of the internet behind such leading industrialites as ukraine. we pay 38 times what the japanese pay for a bit of information. if you buy a triple play package -- i have one in my home -- you pay on average with taxes in the u.s., $160. in france, you pay $38 u.s., and you get worldwide calling to 70 countries, not just the u.s. and canada you get worldwide television, not just domestic, and your internet is 20 times faster uploading and ten times faster downloading, and you're paying less than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand, fundamental principle in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20th century came along it was highways, interstate highway program, for example, and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information super highway. and what does the industry say? don't call it that. the rest of the world -- >> did they literally say that. >> guest: i was told by the pr person
of direction how 1965 transformed america. .. >> what brought you to talk about 1965. >> i had taught history for a number of years and as we moved how to -- actually started doing this in the '60s, so i didn't teach the '60s then because it wasn't history, but later on it became an important part of my courses, and then i've written some books which talked about aspects of the '60s, and i became a little bit uncomfortable with the notion that the -- 60s can be described 1960 to 1970. historians like to do that. and sometimes is works. the are 30s you can do that because of the depression throughout the decade. mostly it doesn't work, and in the case of the '60s, it doesn't. if you look back what was happening in the early '6associations '62, '63, '64, at least until kennedy's assassination in 1963. so much of daily life and popular culture and music and politics and so forth, and the way people dressed and so forth, seemed very much like the are 50s, and when we think of the 60s, we think of turmoil, political polarize. >> urban riots. vietnam. rock concerts, woodstock, so forth and so on. a
invented the internet in america. taxpayers, and set up by academics the military through what's now called darpa, the defense advanced research project agency. so begin at number one. and back in the '90s al gore as soon as vice president and others promote this idea that would have this wondrous thing called internet. when browsers came along in 1995, it meant the geeks were not the ones who could use an apple we all know today as the internet. the telephone companies, the cable companies, all went to capitol hill and state legislatures and said we're going to build his fibers thing. there was this great television and in 1999 were an old geezer, sort of like me by then, polls into this fleabag motel, drop secession assisted young woman behind the desk, rooms, king size beds, room service, entertainment what she looks at him and says every movie ever made in every language in every room. that's a we are promised. this was shot at roy's cafÉ in the mojave desert to the rest of the world was doing that. the internet was being made universal all over the place to america raced 29th with a s
in the mojave desert. the rest of the world is doing that. the other has been made universal. america ranks 29th in the speed of its internet behind such leading industrial life of the world as moldavia and ukraine. we paid the highest prices in the world by far by one measure we take 38 times with the japanese pay for information. if you buy these packages, and i have one in my home, you pay on average with taxes $160. in france to pay $38 get worldwide calling to 70 countries not just u.s. and canada, worldwide television not just domestic and the internet is 20 times faster uploading and downloading and you are paying less than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand a fundamental principal in the 19th century the canal and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20th century can along it was highways, interstate highway program for example and airports that were crucial to economic growth that is the super highway and they don't call it that anymore. the rest of the world is getting inf
state. >> guest: even in those days as it is today, and, still, perhaps america's one -- one of america's most famous anti-slavery advocates, a radical abolitionist. he didn't start that way, but at this point he was. seward, not radical on anti-slavery issues was perceived that way because of a series of speeches he gave viewed as inflammatory. lincoln, on the other hand, because he did not have a national record, could convincingly portray himself as the least radical. in those days, the least anti-slavery republican, up for the race. they go it, and seward doesn't just have the advantage of being the dominant republican and being the governor and senator from new york. seward has thor weed -- >> host: great name. best name ever of an american political figure. >> guest: marvelous. it's portraying weeds', you know, nature, i guess. the finest political operative in the mid 19th century america has to offer. he goes to the convention. he has essentially infinite financial resources in the days when deals under the table involved cash as well as anything else you can imagine. >> host: t
is good for america, but there is not allow a policy prescription in there. >> thank you. very good to see you. enjoyed so much talking to you. >> this event took place at the 17th annual texas book festival in austin, texas. for more information about the festival, visit texasbookfestival.org. >> up next on booktv, "after words" with guest host james hershberg of the wilson center's cold war international history project. this week, david coleman and his latest book, "the fourteenth day: jfk and the aftermath of the cuban missile crisis." in it, the director of the miller center's presidential recordings program details the baseball in october 28, 1962, and shows that the public believes the cuban missile crisis had ended, president kennedy continue to walk a fine diplomatic line. >> host: as you know there's a ton of literature about the cuban missile crisis. most of this focusing on the 13 days as bobby kennedy's memoir was called back in 1969 and hollywood version with kevin costner what made you decide to focus on fmap? >> guest: two things i wanted to talk about in this book, two di
weapons or resources in latin america, -- he came close to having these kinds of weapons. the americans did not know this. kennedy got the idea of impending weapons was absurd. he had no idea that was the plan. that aspect was actually much more dangerous than at the time. >> host: some of them had nuclear loads come is that right. >> guest: yes. >> host: so some of this that happen in november, in order to salvage the soviet to an alliance, the soviets were eager to reassure him that the commitment to saving cuba -- they were desperate to keep as much under cuban control and that the americans can simply not invade cuba with impunity. do they understand that this alliance was in jeopardy? >> and this comes back to the second part of your previous question. why did khrushvhev do this? even half a century later, historians are still arguing about it. khrushvhev said a few things about why he did it. if you go back to the time and you look at what kennedy was thinking. this was not really what he thought he was up to. kennedy was looking at a much more global game. first of all, why would
for the republican party in ohio and much of the with midwest and the big states. perhaps one of america's most famous antislavery advocates famous as a radical abolitionist he didn't start out that way but at this point he was. they are not radical he was generally perceived to be that way because of the speeches that were viewed to read because lincoln didn't have a record he could convince them they were portraying themselves as the least radical who then owned up to the rights so they go in and sewer doesn't just have the it feige of being the dominant republican and the governor from new york. he also [inaudible] >> it's marvelous. it perfectly portrays the inaki valley in nature. it's the finest political operative in the mid-19th century america has to offer. he goes through this connection and he has the financial resources when the days went under the tail to involve cash. anything else you can imagine. >> host: that doesn't happen. >> guest: of course not, never. he's been to many conventions and he's dominated them and in fact sioux word wasn't the republican nominee in 1856 because
their latin america. he came close to having the type of weapon. it would have gotten out of control. the americans didn't know this. kennedy fought the idea of soviets handing nuclear weapons noft possible. it was absurd. he didn't think that. e had no idea that was the plan. so that aspect and the subversion, i think, much more dangerous than i think they thought at the time. because they didn't realize the aspect of the cubans might in fact have the nuclear weapons. >> host: going back to the bombers some of them did have the nuclear payload. >> guest: right. there are military assumptions that go on. >> host: tell me if they understood the dynamic that come out on the research of the soviet union tensions in november which is in order sort of rescue, sal salvage at alliance knowing castro was fourous. they were eager to assure him the commitment to protecting cuba economisted and they were desperate to keep the -- under cuban control. leave a trip wire. that would risk, you know, receive yet involvement. did the americans understand the alliance was in jeopardy? >> guest: it i th
in those days and perhaps america's, one of america's most famous anti-slavery advocates on the national scene. he didn't start out that way but at this point he was. seward also not that radical was generally perceived to be that way because the series of speeches he was giving that were viewed as inflammatory. lincoln because he did not have a national record could portray himself as the least radical. in those days it meant the least antislavery republican who then was up for the race. they go in, and seward just doesn't have the advantage of being the dominant republican and being the governor and senator from new york, seward also has -- >> host: it is a great name. >> guest: it is -- >> host: it's like tom wolfe. >> guest: he portrays weak smock of alien nature i guess. he is the finest political operative in the mid-19th century. he goes to this convention. he has essentially infinite financial resources when deals under the table could involve cash as well as anything else that could happen. >> host: that doesn't happen now. >> guest: of course not. he goes there and back seward
come and i knew he had gone ahead of america as a whole. i grew up and became a journalist and lived through the war in vietnam which raised a lot of interesting questions about the war and its value, and as i said i became a journalist, and about six years ago i was casting around a look idea -- book idea and it occurred to me i should poke around and see what i learned about my uncle and was a does hero because it looked to me as a child? so i did. the first person i got in touch with was an old family friend named charles mclean who was a retired professor at dartmouth, and to my astonishment i discovered that he had actually spent a day with my uncle on the day that he decided to go to war. it was may 31st, 1931. they were both seniors in college, my uncle with harvard and charnels at dartmouth. they met up at st. paul for what was that schools self important equivalent of what they called home coming into other schools with involved voters and book clubs and lots of races but at that point at the end of may in 1941 what was foremost on most people's mind is what was happening in
short, number of other abolitionists that when he got back to america he was going to train slaves, settle them on land as sharecroppers in the certainty that they would become good citizens and free people in the united states. but when he got back to the united states things changed. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. coming up next on book tv, after words with guest host nina rees. this week salman khan and his book the one world schoolhouse. in it he presents the benefits of online universal education for primary and secondary school students. the former hedge fund analyst also discusses his career change to public educators. >> host: tell us a little bit about your book and the journey that you underwent before you started the academy which let you writing this book. >> well, the book -- well, it is a little bit about that journey but really how that journey kind of informed white the academy has become and how that could inform what classrooms could become more what learning to become, and not in just the kind of high by in the sky kind of way, wit
in your book stores all across america. and what i said to people was -- and i still say -- and i say this unapologetically -- if you write a book you want people to read your book. there are thousands of books in any book store. there are hundreds of thousands of books in any big library, and you got a lot of competition. the first thing you want to do, if you're an author, is to at least have somebody pick up the book. and so when i was thinking of a title issue thousand what i can title this book that would get somebody to take a peek, read the first paragraph. and i thought, well, nigger. nigger is a strange career of a trouble self-word. and i thought that would -- just think hard about words, think hard about examples, get the readers attention. that's what i was trying to do with the title. >> up next on booktv, "afterwords" with guest host, the president of the national alliance of public charter schools. this week, sol month and his book, the one world schoolhouse. in it, presenting the benefits of online universal education for primary and secondary school students and discu
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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